Humble Garden

ReSkilling for future food independence

A tighter knit local food economy

Posted by Nika On December - 13 - 2009

Goats

I recently made an arrangement with a local grocery store (owned in MA but a BIG chain) to get some of their produce scraps for our chickens and goats.

The majority of their scraps go to pig farmers who drop off big oil barrels for the lettuce remnants that the pig food trader/merchant/dude picks them up later.

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

I love that we can take something considered waste and give it to our animals.

They LOVE these fresh greens!

I love it all because it fits in with the permacultural ethic by using a resource effectively and in a humane holistic way – Free inputs.

In the case of the goats – the yields are manure, growing babies (9 does are pregnant) and later fresh raw goats milk!

Witness the goat-silly feeding frenzy.

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Chickens LOVE the greens a whole lot too.

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Permaculture Inputs: Free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

In the case of the chickens, the yield is manure, bug-eating, meat and eggs! Free range and very yellow yolked eggs!

Permaculture Yield: free range eggs from backyard flock fed on free "waste" lettuce from grocery store

Another reason I like this is that it knits our food production tighter into the local fabric. It also brings vitamins to our animals that they would not usually get in the winter. During the summer our animals eat tremendous amounts of leaves and trees in the case of the goats and endless bugs and grasses and weeds (and MY GARDEN) in the case of the chickens.

6 Responses to “A tighter knit local food economy”

  1. Erika says:

    Nika, the new look here is absolutely stunning! It’s very clean and professional looking.

    And I love the photos of the goats eating the greens together.

  2. Nika says:

    Erika,

    Thanks! I loved the graphics on the old theme but I realized that it was hard to find content and to explore. This theme brings out the photography and I think helps people surf deeper and explore! Glad you like it!

    Those crazy goats – I tried to give you a sense for the feeding frenzy.

  3. Katrien says:

    Love the new look!

    And the loop-project. I approached our local Whole Foods or their scraps, but they have closed the loop for their profit: they make it into compost themselves, which they then sell in their store. Kudos for them but bad luck for me! I might try the other supermarket.

    Bon appetit!

  4. Nika says:

    Katrien,

    thnx :-) I have heard others having issues with Whole Foods. Definitely try other markets, hope you have better luck!

  5. Kim says:

    That’s wonderful that you’ve found a source of fresh greens! A farmer my dh works with some times also gets them from a local grocery store.
    I see you have LaMancha goats!! I used to have a few goats when we had a larger farm. One was a LaMancha and she was the dearest goat. I miss them!

  6. Nika says:

    Kim,

    Yeah, these goats are real sweeties.

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About Me

We are a family of 5, including Nika, Ed, Q (14), KD (7), and Baby Oh (4). We garden 1024 square feet of raised beds plus assorted permacultural plantings. We also have 13 LaMancha dairy goats, 40 chickens, and one guard llama.

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    Fields near Clay Barn BridgeLast month, I got extra scions from the scions exchange to give my coworker who wanted to try grafting to some of the wild Plums in his property. Well, he bought a bunch of bear root fruit trees and gave me some of the branches that he pruned off. Thank y_DSC9572.jpgFebruary 18, 2017 at 07:53PM